Catholic dating tips: Lessons from a strip-tease dancer

Why do many men go to clubs to watch a strip-tease dancer do her art?  Well, she can simply go out naked on stage, gyrate, and spread her legs, but there would be nothing exciting about it.  It’s just that: there is no more room for imagination.  As Einstein said, imagination is more powerful than knowledge.  So to arouse men’s sexual passions, a strip-tease dancer has to invite men to a journey of discovery by making them think and guess what lies more beyond than meets the eye.  A strip-tease dancer must turn herself into a rosebud with her petals all wrapped up, and then slowly bloom before men’s eyes, opening each petal one by one as the Spring opens skillfully and mysteriously her first rose: the outer coat, shirt, and bra; the skirt, the shoes, the stockings, the half-slip, and underwear.  And finally there is nothing left to see, but a woman gyrating on stage.

A visit to the Oratory of St. Ignatius of Loyola at the Loyola House of Studies

Main entrance of the Oratory of St. Ignatius of Loyola

Main entrance of the Oratory of St. Ignatius of Loyola at the Loyola House of Studies

I went to the Loyola House of Studies this afternoon to meet with Fr. Jose Quilongquilong, SJ. It was difficult to catch him. I went to LHS a few days ago and the porter told me that Fr. Joe will be back this Friday. So I prepared my letter of request and decided to meet him at about 5 pm. I waited at the lobby and sat on one of the sofas.

The porter called. He is not around in his office.

“Paging Fr. Quilongquilong.”

After a while Fr. Quilongquilong came. Fr. Quilongquilong is the Rector of the Loyola House of Studies. He was ordained priest in 1993 and finished his Doctorate in Spirituality in the Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome. He worked as regional secretary for Asia-Pacific at the Jesuit General Curia. For his dissertation, he wrote about the grace of vocation in the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola with Fr. Anton Witwer, S.J. as mentor. (Loyola School of Theology)

“Father, Dr. Sugon of the Latin Mass Society would like to meet you. Oh, there he is.”

So I stood up and went forward.

“Father, I am Dr. Quirino Sugon of the Ateneo Latin Mass Society.”

Fr. Quilongquilong signed me to sit down.

“Our priest is Fr. Tim Ofrasio, SJ.” I continued. “We would like to request the use of the Oratory of St. Ignatius of Loyola for a Traditional Latin Mass.”

“When would that be?” Fr. Quilongquilong asked.

“November 24, 6:30-8:00 p.m.”

“Do you have a letter?”

“Yes,” I said and I handed him my letter.

“Would you like to visit the oratory?” he asked.

“That would be great, Father.”

“How many are you in the mass?”

“About 20 to 30, Father.”

“The oratory is too big for you.”

“I think we can double the attendees.”

On the far end of the lobby is a spiral staircase. Beneath it is a white statue of our Lady. Behind the staircase is a glass wall with a view of a green field of grass with a statue of St. Ignatius looking at an empty pond. A corridor to the right leads to the Cardinal Sin Center where the LHS Theological Hour is usually held. In normal days the center functions as a cafeteria.

We went up the staircase. On the second floor is the Oratory. We genuflected upon passing by the altar.

Oratory of St. Ignatius of Loyola (North side) at the Loyola House of Studies

Oratory of St. Ignatius of Loyola (North side) at the Loyola House of Studies

It is an empty church, but unrivaled in architectural design. It is the most fitting for the Traditional Latin Mass. I think it can fit about 200 to 300 persons. There are still enough space at the overhanging second level. On the far side near the entrance is the choir loft–truly aloft. I can’t still make out of the Altar. It is dark. The sun is setting and light streamed through the stained glass windows. Then I recall the words of Pope Benedict XVI in his homily at St. Patrick’s Cathedral:

The first has to do with the stained glass windows, which flood the interior with mystic light. From the outside, those windows are dark, heavy, even dreary. But once one enters the church, they suddenly come alive; reflecting the light passing through them, they reveal all their splendor. Many writers — here in America we can think of Nathaniel Hawthorne — have used the image of stained glass to illustrate the mystery of the Church herself. It is only from the inside, from the experience of faith and ecclesial life, that we see the Church as she truly is: flooded with grace, resplendent in beauty, adorned by the manifold gifts of the Spirit. It follows that we, who live the life of grace within the Church’s communion, are called to draw all people into this mystery of light.

(New York Times)

We went farther to the main entrance. It’s the crossroads.

“That’s the refectory,” Fr. Quilongquilong said as he pointed towards the West. “People would be coming from there (the North wing) and pass by this corridor. I don’t want a religious activity going on while the community is having supper from 7:00-8:00 p.m.”

“Ok, Father. I understand.”

“I shall first check with the community.”

“Thank you, Father.” And I raised his fingers to my forehead for blessing. Then we parted.

When I arrived at my office at Manila Observatory, I received a text from Fr. Quilongquilong. He confirmed that there is no scheduled activity at the Oratory on the 24th of November. But he suggested that we move the time to 5:30-7:00 pm.

“If Latin Mass is earlier then I would like our Jesuit scholastics to attend it,” he said.

I replied that the schedule is ok with me, but I shall first confer with Fr. Tim and my group in ALMS.

God works in wondrous ways.

Please pray for the Philippine Jesuits and the Ateneo Latin Mass Society.

Fr. Victor Badillo, SJ recounts his experiences on the Traditional Latin Mass

This afternoon I visited Fr. Victor Badillo, SJ at the Jesuit Infirmary in Ateneo de Manila University. It has been more than a month or two since I visited him. I usually give him updates about the Manila Observatory. At 86, he cannot anymore walk. He needs a nurse to drive his wheelchair.

“Hi, Father.” I said as I entered his room.

“Hi, Pope,” he said as he signaled to the nurse to bring me a chair. “I learned about your Latin Mass Society.”

“Yes, Father.” I said. “Fr. Tim Ofrasio is our priest. He is a professor of Liturgy so he knows the old and new rites well.”

“Where do you get your vestments?” asked Fr. Badillo.

“Our sacristan trainor is Bro. Dave of the Liturgical Commission of Cubao. He is still designing our vestments.”

“So do you know the Confiteor, the prayers at the foot of the altar?”

“A little bit, Father. I still have to memorize it.”

And he prayed the Confiteor and I followed him. I know this prayer because I always use my Baronius 1962 missal even when I attend Novus Ordo masses.

“Do you know how to sing?” he asked. And he began to intone the Kyrie, the Sanctus, the Gloria, and the Pater Noster. I joined him in the singing. He is singing the songs in Missa de Angelis which we always use in our Latin masses. I joined the choir before when they practiced these songs. We bought our chant book from Our Lady of Victories, an SSPX church in Cubao, which has excellent resources on the Traditional Latin Mass. (May they be finally reconciled with the Catholic Church soon.)

“When I was young, I was also a sacristan,” said Fr. Badillo. “Whenever there are masses outside the school, we Ateneans always volunteer to serve in the masses, because there are very few who knows how to serve. We have this group called “Sanctuario”. We take turns in serving masses for a priest. We woke up at 4 am, because the priest says mass during that time.”

“Four o’clock in the morning?” I asked.

“Yes, 4 o’clock,” said Fr. Badillo. “Before we were that hard when it comes to serving masses. Now people are becoming soft, lax.”

“In the seminary, we learned about the mass. We were trained in Latin. But when we graduated, we were ordained in Vatican II.”

“So your training was to no avail, Father?” I asked.

“Not really,” he said.

And our conversation drifted to other things: about the ionosphere and magnetosphere project, about NASA and Dr. Lagrosas trip to Palawan, about our friend Genie Lorenzo who is back from a vacation in US, about Dr. Kendra Gotangco Castillo–our Valedictorian and Summa cum Laude–who is back from Purdue University and who now heads Klima Climate Change Center, and about the International Space Weather Conference in Nigeria which I am attending this October.

“Many things are now happening in Manila Observatory, Father.”

“It started when you came,” Fr. Badillo said.

And we both laughed. The first time I went to the Manila Observatory was in 2008. Fr. Daniel McNamara, SJ asked me to stay in the Ionosphere Building, the building of Fr. Badillo, to write my dissertation. I lived a monastic life. But Fr. Badillo was not there when I came: he suffered several surgeries years before. The building was still dark and dusty then. Now, it is fully renovated and repainted. But I am still using his desk and his swivel chair.

Before I left, I took his hand to my forehead.

“Father, your skin is now soft unlike before.”

“Soft as woman’s skin.”

And we laughed again.

“How did that happen, Father?”

“Healthy diet. Just health diet.”

Finally, I said goodbye to Fr. Badillo. And he gave me his blessing.

Missa Cantata on June 19 at the Shrine of St. Thererese of the Child Jesus in Villamor Airbase, Pasay City

We invite you to participate with us in a Missa Cantata in the Traditional Latin Roman Rite on Sunday, June 19, 2011 at 9:00am at the Shrine of St. Therese of the Child Jesus (across NAIA3 in Villamor Airbase) in celebration of the Feast of the Most Holy Trinity.

The priest celebrant is Fr. Dominic Maria Lim, OFM Conv., Rector of St. Maximilian Kolbe Seminary.  He will be assisted at the Altar by the servers of Societas LSSG.  Our Schola Cantorum will be the seminarians of St. Maximilian

Ateneo Latin Mass Society: Call for choir and sacristans

Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2011 22:06:10 +0800
Ateneo Blueboard

The Ateneo Latin Mass Society (ALMS) is an organization of faculty, students, staff, and alumni of Ateneo de Manila University for the promotion of the Latin Mass in both the ordinary and extraordinary forms of the Roman Rite, but with a preferential option for the extraordinary form, in the Ignatian tradition of magis or “more”. Starting this July 2011, ALMS shall sponsor Latin masses at the Ateneo High School once a month. The priest celebrant will be Fr. Timoteo “Tim” Ofrasio, SJ, a professor of Liturgy at the Loyola House of Studies and parish priest of Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish in Novaliches.

Also, starting this June 2011, ALMS shall sponsor trainings for the sacristan and choir:

  1. Sacristan training is four Sundays, 9-12 am. Possible venue is Nativity of Our Lady Parish, Maj. Dizon St., Industrial Village, Marikina City. The training shall cover the following topics: (a) history of altar servers, (b) Holy Mass as the highest form of worship,(c) liturgical year, (d) altar vestments and vessels, (e) ecclesiastical Latin pronunciation, (f) ordinary form of the Roman Rite, (g) extraordinary form of the Roman rite, (h) practicum, and (i) commissioning. The training is organized by ALMS and by the Commission on Liturgy of the Diocese of Cubao.
  2. Choir training is at least an hour a week for the whole year. The training shall cover the following topics: (a) ecclesiastical Latin pronunciation, (b) Gregorian neumes (square notes), (b) ictus and breathing marks, (c) chanting of mass responses, (d) chants for Ordinary Feasts (Missa de Angelis), (e) chants for Feasts of Blessed Virgin (cum Jubilo), (f) chants for Sundays throughout the year, (g) chants for Sundays and Ferias of Advent and Lent, (h) Credo, Pater Noster, and Salve Regina, (i) and chants for Benediction (Tantum Ergo, Te Deum, Anima Christi, O Salutaris Hostia, Pange Lingua, Panis Angelicus). The Gregorian chant trainor will be Mr. Carlos Babiano of Our Lady of Miraculous Medal Parish, Quezon City. The choir training will be held within or close to Ateneo.

The aim of ALMS is to give greater glory to God by making the Latin mass in both ordinary and extraordinary forms of the Roman Rite available to many, as envisioned by Vatican II’s Sacrosanctum Concilium:

  1. Particular law remaining in force, the use of the Latin language is to be preserved in the Latin rites. (Art. 36.1)
  2. The Church acknowledges Gregorian chant as specially suited to the Roman liturgy: therefore, other things being equal, it should be given pride of place in liturgical services. (Art 116)

If you wish to know more about the ALMS-sponsored activities, follow us in Facebook: Ateneo Latin Mass Society. Click the “Like” button, so that you can post your comments.

Those interested to join the sacristan and choir training may wish to directly contact the ALMS Coordinator:

Dr. Quirino Sugon Jr.
Space Environment Research Center (SERC) Subcenter
Ionosphere Research Building
Manila Observatory
Tel. No. 426-6001 local 4850
Email: qsugon@observatory.ph

Ateneo Latin Mass Society: Mission and Vision

ATENEO LATIN MASS SOCIETY

Mission and Vision

Ateneo Latin Mass Society (ALMS) is an association in Ateneo de Manila University which seeks to give greater glory to God by making the most beautiful celebration of the Roman Rite in Latin in both ordinary and extraordinary forms available to all.

To accomplish this, the ALMS shall do the following:

  1. Foster the use of Latin in the Roman Rite as mandated by Vatican II’s Sacrosanctum Concilium

  2. Promote both the ordinary and extraordinary forms of the Roman Rite, but with a preferential option for the extraordinary form in the Ignatian tradition of magis and excellence

  3. Train choir groups who can perfectly sing all the chants in Liber Usualis, in obedience to the mandate of Vatican II’s Constitution of the Sacred Liturgy that the Gregorian Chant should be given pride of place in the Roman Liturgy

  4. Train sacristan groups who knows by heart the responses and rubrics of both the ordinary and extraordinary masses in all seasons of the year.

  5. Train Jesuit seminarians, deacons, and priests in the words, rubrics, and chants in the extraordinary form of the Roman Rite

  6. Teach the congregation how to pray the rosary in Latin and how to chant the responses in missa cantata

  7. Provide the most exquisite vessels and vestments for any Jesuit priest who wishes to say the Latin Mass

  8. Promote Jesuit vocations, novenas to Jesuit saints, and prayers for the souls of living and dead Jesuits.

  9. Establish the Institute for Latin Studies for the study of the classical, medieval, and ecclessiastical Latin literature, especially those written by Jesuit saints and scholars.

  10. Promote the use of Gothic and Romanesque church architecture for the Roman Rite.

  11. Promote the Spirtual Exercises of St. Ignatius

  12. Promote St. Ignatius’s Rules for Thinking, Judging, and Feeling with the Church.

  13. Establish Latin Mass Societies in all Ateneo schools and form a worldwide Latin Mass Society of Jesuit Schools

  14. Coordinate with the Jesuit hierarchy and Church hierarchy in promoting the use of the Latin and Gregorian chant in all Jesuit schools and in all parishes.

  15. Promote Jesuit spirituality through the Sodality of our Lady and the Devotion to the Sacred Heart.

Latin Mass at Ateneo High School Chapel postponed to June 2011 due to chapel renovation

Fr. Tim Ofrasio, S.J. celebrating the Ateneo Latin Mass Society's Inaugural Mass at the Ateneo de Manila University High School Chapel last March 3, 2011

Fr. Tim Ofrasio, S.J. celebrating the Ateneo Latin Mass Society's Inaugural Mass at the Ateneo de Manila University High School Chapel last March 3, 2011

25 April 2011
 
Dear ALMS members and friends,
 
Happy Easter!
 
Today I called Ma’m Ditas of the Ateneo High School Campus Ministry to finalize our schedule of May 4 for our Latin Mass.  She said that the renovation of the Ateneo High School Chapel shall start next week; all activities for May at the chapel are canceled.  Our next mass shall be on June 2011.
 
The Loyola Schools Campus Ministry has agreed to place one of our posters in the College chapel bulletin board.  We need to recruit more people to attend our mass.  I met Fr. Tim yesterday in Novaliches.  He wishes that on our next mass, more will attend.  We shall set the mass at 6 pm at not anymore at 7 pm so that more can come.  Those with mass intentions can send them directly to Fr. Tim before the mass: put your donation on a sealed letter envelope, then write your name (optional) and your intention (birthday, souls in Purgatory, thanksgiving, healing, etc).  Those who wish to help defray the minimum expense for the mass can send their donations to me before or after the mass. The minimum expense for the mass is Php 4,000. Php 2000 goes to Fr. Tim, Php 1,000 goes to the chapel rental, and Php 1,000 goes to the campus ministry staff overtime pay. Place your donation on a sealed letter envelope, write your name (optional), and write “For Latin Mass Expenses”.
 
We are currently laying the groundwork for the sacristan and choir training in the first semester.  We shall ask experts to train us.  We shall also have tutorials in Latin.  Donations to ALMS can defray the costs of these trainings (because we also need to financially support our priests, religious, and lay experts).  The trainees can opt to divide the cost among themselves–more trainees, lesser cost.  And our donors and experts would be happy to know that what they impart reaches a greater audience for the greater glory of God.  So let us recruit more people to join the sacristan, choir, and Latin language training. Spread the word.  We wish ALMS to set the standard for serving at the altar and singing the Gregorian chants in both Ordinary and Extraordinary Forms of the Roman Rite.  After we finish ironing out the kinks in these trainings, I shall post the invitations in the Ateneo Blueboard and in the College Chapel.
 
By the way, Fr. Tim has trained his altar servers and choir in his parish in Novaliches.  The Easter mass last Sunday (ordinary form) was sung mostly in Latin (Credo, Gloria, Pater Noster, etc), even if it was not Fr. Tim who celebrated the mass.  If Fr. Tim can do it in Novaliches, we can also do it here in Ateneo. 
 
Sincerely yours,
 
Quirino
 
Monkshobbit: The Latin mass is in the ordinary form (Novus Ordo) of the Roman Rite; our choir and altar servers are not yet trained for the extraordinary form (Tridentine).