A visit to the Oratory of St. Ignatius of Loyola at the Loyola House of Studies

Main entrance of the Oratory of St. Ignatius of Loyola

Main entrance of the Oratory of St. Ignatius of Loyola at the Loyola House of Studies

I went to the Loyola House of Studies this afternoon to meet with Fr. Jose Quilongquilong, SJ. It was difficult to catch him. I went to LHS a few days ago and the porter told me that Fr. Joe will be back this Friday. So I prepared my letter of request and decided to meet him at about 5 pm. I waited at the lobby and sat on one of the sofas.

The porter called. He is not around in his office.

“Paging Fr. Quilongquilong.”

After a while Fr. Quilongquilong came. Fr. Quilongquilong is the Rector of the Loyola House of Studies. He was ordained priest in 1993 and finished his Doctorate in Spirituality in the Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome. He worked as regional secretary for Asia-Pacific at the Jesuit General Curia. For his dissertation, he wrote about the grace of vocation in the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola with Fr. Anton Witwer, S.J. as mentor. (Loyola School of Theology)

“Father, Dr. Sugon of the Latin Mass Society would like to meet you. Oh, there he is.”

So I stood up and went forward.

“Father, I am Dr. Quirino Sugon of the Ateneo Latin Mass Society.”

Fr. Quilongquilong signed me to sit down.

“Our priest is Fr. Tim Ofrasio, SJ.” I continued. “We would like to request the use of the Oratory of St. Ignatius of Loyola for a Traditional Latin Mass.”

“When would that be?” Fr. Quilongquilong asked.

“November 24, 6:30-8:00 p.m.”

“Do you have a letter?”

“Yes,” I said and I handed him my letter.

“Would you like to visit the oratory?” he asked.

“That would be great, Father.”

“How many are you in the mass?”

“About 20 to 30, Father.”

“The oratory is too big for you.”

“I think we can double the attendees.”

On the far end of the lobby is a spiral staircase. Beneath it is a white statue of our Lady. Behind the staircase is a glass wall with a view of a green field of grass with a statue of St. Ignatius looking at an empty pond. A corridor to the right leads to the Cardinal Sin Center where the LHS Theological Hour is usually held. In normal days the center functions as a cafeteria.

We went up the staircase. On the second floor is the Oratory. We genuflected upon passing by the altar.

Oratory of St. Ignatius of Loyola (North side) at the Loyola House of Studies

Oratory of St. Ignatius of Loyola (North side) at the Loyola House of Studies

It is an empty church, but unrivaled in architectural design. It is the most fitting for the Traditional Latin Mass. I think it can fit about 200 to 300 persons. There are still enough space at the overhanging second level. On the far side near the entrance is the choir loft–truly aloft. I can’t still make out of the Altar. It is dark. The sun is setting and light streamed through the stained glass windows. Then I recall the words of Pope Benedict XVI in his homily at St. Patrick’s Cathedral:

The first has to do with the stained glass windows, which flood the interior with mystic light. From the outside, those windows are dark, heavy, even dreary. But once one enters the church, they suddenly come alive; reflecting the light passing through them, they reveal all their splendor. Many writers — here in America we can think of Nathaniel Hawthorne — have used the image of stained glass to illustrate the mystery of the Church herself. It is only from the inside, from the experience of faith and ecclesial life, that we see the Church as she truly is: flooded with grace, resplendent in beauty, adorned by the manifold gifts of the Spirit. It follows that we, who live the life of grace within the Church’s communion, are called to draw all people into this mystery of light.

(New York Times)

We went farther to the main entrance. It’s the crossroads.

“That’s the refectory,” Fr. Quilongquilong said as he pointed towards the West. “People would be coming from there (the North wing) and pass by this corridor. I don’t want a religious activity going on while the community is having supper from 7:00-8:00 p.m.”

“Ok, Father. I understand.”

“I shall first check with the community.”

“Thank you, Father.” And I raised his fingers to my forehead for blessing. Then we parted.

When I arrived at my office at Manila Observatory, I received a text from Fr. Quilongquilong. He confirmed that there is no scheduled activity at the Oratory on the 24th of November. But he suggested that we move the time to 5:30-7:00 pm.

“If Latin Mass is earlier then I would like our Jesuit scholastics to attend it,” he said.

I replied that the schedule is ok with me, but I shall first confer with Fr. Tim and my group in ALMS.

God works in wondrous ways.

Please pray for the Philippine Jesuits and the Ateneo Latin Mass Society.

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Latin Mass (Ordinary Form) at Ateneo de Manila High School on August 25, 2011, 6:00-7:30 pm

Latin Mass at Ateneo High School for the Feast of St. Augustine of Hippo

Latin Mass at Ateneo High School for the Feast of St. Augustine of Hippo, August 2011

Everyone is invited to a Latin Mass on Thursday, 25 August 2011,
6:00-7:30 pm at Ateneo High School Chapel of the First Companions. It will be a sung mass (missa cantata) in the ordinary form of the Roman Rite. This mass is a votive mass in honor of St. Augustine of Hippo, Doctor of the Church. The priest celebrant is Fr. Timoteo Ofrasio, SJ, professor of Liturgy at the Loyola House of Studies.

6:00-6:20 pm Rehearsal in the singing of the mass responses and the other chants
6:20-6:30 pm Prayers before the mass
6:30-7:30 pm Latin Mass
7:30-7:40 pm Prayers after the mass

The mass is sponsored by the Ateneo Latin Mass Society. Donations for
mass intentions are welcome. The mass intentions will be read before
the mass.

Sincerely yours,

Dr. Quirino Sugon Jr.
Coordinator
Ateneo Latin Mass Society

Fr. Tim Ofrasio celebrating the ordinary form of the Roman Rite in Latin at the Ateneo de Manila High School Chapel

Fr. Tim Ofrasio celebrating the ordinary form of the Roman Rite

Loyola House of Studies denies showing controversial works of Mideo Cruz at 2007 Tutok Nexus Exhibit

The statement by Fr. Jose Mario Francisco, S.J. regarding the CCP exhibit:

We categorically deny reports that the controversial works of Mideo Cruz at
CCP were part of the 2007 Tutok Nexus exhibit at Loyola School of Theology,
Ateneo de Manila.
Jose Mario C. Francicso, SJ

President
Loyola School of Theology
Ateneo de Manila University

Was the CCP Poleteismo exhibit condemned by the bishops shown before in Loyola House of Studies?

Update: Loyola House of Studies denies showing controversial works of Mideo Cruz at 2007 Tutok Nexus Exhibit

From the Business World:

Since the controversy over Poleteismo exploded, the CCP’s Visual Arts Unit has been fielding calls from people requesting that Kulo be shut down. “The CCP will not be party to any censorship or suppression. Let it be a point of discussion,” said Ms. Flores, adding that she has seen works at the CCP that were “really, really, really more provocative and disturbing.” (Jose Legaspi’s installation in the Small Gallery, for example, which included a modified Pieta showing the Virgin Mother vomiting on the dead Christ.)

Poleteismo is an old piece first shown in 2002 at the Vargas Museum of the University of the Philippines. Mr. Cruz wasn’t thinking of the Reproductive Health Bill when he conceived Poleteismo nine years ago.

Versions of the installation have been exhibited elsewhere, most notably in 2007 in the lobby of the Loyola House of Studies (LHS) — a seminary inside the campus of the Ateneo de Manila University — as part of Tutok: Nexus, a group exhibit organized in cooperation with Simbahang Lingkod ng Bayan (SLB), “an association of religious priests, seminarians and lay people committed to the service of the Filipino Church and the Filipino nation.”

If Catholic clergymen had kept quiet, if Archbishop Oscar Cruz hadn’t called the exhibit “sickening,” if he hadn’t called the artist “sick,” if he hadn’t advised the artist to see a psychiatrist, if he hadn’t implied that the artist’s sexuality was abnormal, if Bishop Deogracias Iniguez hadn’t called for a boycott, then Mideo Cruz’s Poleteismo could have gone unnoticed by the larger public.

When they find it in one of the alcoves of the Main Gallery, they will see multicolored plastic piggy banks stuffed inside a case usually reserved for religious statues; and Christ the King with a bright red clown nose, his right hand replaced by a Mickey Mouse glove, and his head crowned with Mickey Mouse ears made from a Coke can.

Hanging behind a divider is a cross with a bright red penis thrusting out from the vertical bar. And on the walls, a multimedia collage composed of a confusion of images and objects: there are ads, political paraphernalia from Fernando Poe Junior, Gilbert Teodoro, and Barack Obama; there are religious posters of Jesus Christ, Virgin Mary, and the Holy Family; there are handouts, pamphlets, and stickers; there are rosaries, penis ashtrays, crucifixes, condoms, and Christmas lights; there’s a lot of stuff.

“Thereís nothing there that you won’t see in Quiapo,” said Karen O. Flores, officer-in-charge of the CCP Visual Arts Unit.

Latin Mass in Ordinary Form in Ateneo de Manila University High School on July 28, 6:00-7:00 p.m.

From the Ateneo Blueboard:

Everyone is invited to a Solemn High Mass in Latin in Ordinary Form (Novus Ordo) on Thursday, July 28, 2011, 6:00-7:00 p.m. at the Chapel of the First Companions in Ateneo High School.  This is a votive mass in honor of St. Ignatius of Loyola.  The priest celebrant will be Fr. Tim Ofrasio, SJ, Professor of Liturgy at the Loyola House of Studies.

The mass responses will be sung and the choir shall sing the chants in Missa de Angelis.

Those interested may like to confirm their attendance by sending an email to the  the ALMS coordinator:

Dr. Quirino Sugon Jr.

Coordinator
Ateneo Latin Mass Society
qsugon@ateneo.edu

P.S. Follow us in Facebook

Chapels in Ateneo de Manila University High School: Chapel of the First Companions and Chapel of St. Stanislaus Kostka

Chapel of the First Companions in Ateneo de Manila University High School

Ateneo Latin Mass Society: Call for choir and sacristans

Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2011 22:06:10 +0800
Ateneo Blueboard

The Ateneo Latin Mass Society (ALMS) is an organization of faculty, students, staff, and alumni of Ateneo de Manila University for the promotion of the Latin Mass in both the ordinary and extraordinary forms of the Roman Rite, but with a preferential option for the extraordinary form, in the Ignatian tradition of magis or “more”. Starting this July 2011, ALMS shall sponsor Latin masses at the Ateneo High School once a month. The priest celebrant will be Fr. Timoteo “Tim” Ofrasio, SJ, a professor of Liturgy at the Loyola House of Studies and parish priest of Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish in Novaliches.

Also, starting this June 2011, ALMS shall sponsor trainings for the sacristan and choir:

  1. Sacristan training is four Sundays, 9-12 am. Possible venue is Nativity of Our Lady Parish, Maj. Dizon St., Industrial Village, Marikina City. The training shall cover the following topics: (a) history of altar servers, (b) Holy Mass as the highest form of worship,(c) liturgical year, (d) altar vestments and vessels, (e) ecclesiastical Latin pronunciation, (f) ordinary form of the Roman Rite, (g) extraordinary form of the Roman rite, (h) practicum, and (i) commissioning. The training is organized by ALMS and by the Commission on Liturgy of the Diocese of Cubao.
  2. Choir training is at least an hour a week for the whole year. The training shall cover the following topics: (a) ecclesiastical Latin pronunciation, (b) Gregorian neumes (square notes), (b) ictus and breathing marks, (c) chanting of mass responses, (d) chants for Ordinary Feasts (Missa de Angelis), (e) chants for Feasts of Blessed Virgin (cum Jubilo), (f) chants for Sundays throughout the year, (g) chants for Sundays and Ferias of Advent and Lent, (h) Credo, Pater Noster, and Salve Regina, (i) and chants for Benediction (Tantum Ergo, Te Deum, Anima Christi, O Salutaris Hostia, Pange Lingua, Panis Angelicus). The Gregorian chant trainor will be Mr. Carlos Babiano of Our Lady of Miraculous Medal Parish, Quezon City. The choir training will be held within or close to Ateneo.

The aim of ALMS is to give greater glory to God by making the Latin mass in both ordinary and extraordinary forms of the Roman Rite available to many, as envisioned by Vatican II’s Sacrosanctum Concilium:

  1. Particular law remaining in force, the use of the Latin language is to be preserved in the Latin rites. (Art. 36.1)
  2. The Church acknowledges Gregorian chant as specially suited to the Roman liturgy: therefore, other things being equal, it should be given pride of place in liturgical services. (Art 116)

If you wish to know more about the ALMS-sponsored activities, follow us in Facebook: Ateneo Latin Mass Society. Click the “Like” button, so that you can post your comments.

Those interested to join the sacristan and choir training may wish to directly contact the ALMS Coordinator:

Dr. Quirino Sugon Jr.
Space Environment Research Center (SERC) Subcenter
Ionosphere Research Building
Manila Observatory
Tel. No. 426-6001 local 4850
Email: qsugon@observatory.ph

Horror of horrors! Why is JesCom sponsoring a suspense-thriller?

*Horror of horrors! Why is JesCom sponsoring a suspense-thriller? *

by Dit Sablan

Yes, Jesuit Communications is sponsoring *The Rite*, Warner Brothers’
newest film on exorcism which stars Academy Award winner Anthony
Hopkins. But the film is not your run-of-the-mill exorcist B-movie. It
is based on journalist Matt Baglio’s book, “*The Rite: The Making of a
Modern Exorcist,”* which tells the real life story of Father Gary Thomas
and how he trained and became the official exorcist of San Jose,
California.  In a recent interview with /Zenit News Agency/, Father
Thomas mentions that he and Baglio were not only consulted in the
production of the film but were physically present in the shooting as
well — an assurance of the film’s orthodoxy.

But why should *The Rite* be a relevant film for us?

First, although there are admittedly very few official exorcists around,
the rite of exorcism continues to be a ministry in the Church, following
Jesus Christ who expelled demons from people during his time. There was
a time when, before ordination, would-be priests were ordained to the
minor order of exorcism. And although this practice is no longer
observed in most seminaries, perhaps due to the advent of the scientific
age, the Church nonetheless continues the ministry of exorcism, even as
it maintains its teaching on the existence of the Devil!

Second, in the /Zenit/ interview, Father Thomas reveals a sense of
urgency within the Church as regards this sensitive matter. He cites for
example that months before John Paul II died in 2005, the Pope requested
that each diocese in the Church be equipped with a trained exorcist.
Likewise, recently, the US Bishops met in Baltimore over this issue.
Significantly, Father Thomas as the bishops’ resource person, pointed
out that the youth today are at risk of demonic influences and even
possession, because of their interest in the occult, now widely known as
the new age phenomenon. (Parents beware!)

Finally, the movie is relevant because as Father Thomas says, more than
a suspense-thriller, *The Rite* is a movie about our Faith. Indeed it
deals with our unending daily struggle to win over our demons and our
unending fight against the forces of evil in this world. Surprisingly,
this horror movie may yet inspire us towards greater faith!

/The Advanced Screening of *The Rite* is on Friday, 28 January 2011,
7pm, SM Megamall, Cinema 9. Father Joseph Syquia, official exorcist of
the Archdiocese of Manila will start the event with a brief talk.
Tickets are sold at P500.  Available at the following Tanging Yaman
Outlets: 1. Sonolux Building, Seminary Drive, Ateneo de Manila
University,   2.  Loyola House of Studies, Ateneo de Manila University,
and  3.  5th Floor, SM Megamall Building B, Mandaluyong City.
/

/For more information, call 426-5971 local 111 – 113.

/