On how biblical verses on Felix Manalo of INC can apply to Muhammad or Gregorio Aglipay

Comment by seeker March 1, 2012 at 11:46 pm

Mr. Sugon, your question cannot be answered by just one statement or explained in just one verse. There were many prophesies in the Bible that prove Bro. Felix Manalo was the Last Messenger of God. It’s like puzzles that when you put them all together, you get the answer.

Reply by Quirino M. Sugon Jr March 10, 2012 at 11:43 

I am puzzled how INC can put together verses in the Bible to prove that Felix Manalo is the Last Messenger of God. The Last Messenger of God is not a unique teaching, because it was borrowed from the Muslims: Muhammad is the Last Messenger. If you claim that the latter days is 1914 because of the rumors of wars, the Muslims can also claim such a thing because they are the ones who started the wars, conquering the Christian lands around the Mediterranean Sea: Spain, North Africa, Eqypt, Syria, Asia Minor, and Constantinople. Muhammad also came from the East. He also teaches about the One True God, Allah. He also teaches that Jesus is just a man, a prophet. All the verses that you can use to prove that Felix Manalo was foretold in the Bible can equally apply to Muhammad.

If you claim that the Last Messenger must be in the Philippines, such title can also apply to Gregorio Aglipay who founded the Independent Church of the Philippines founded in 1903. Like Manalo, he also rejected the Trinity. Like Manalo, he also hates the Catholic Church. Like Manalo, he is also a Freemason. All the verses that you can use to prove that Felix Manalo was foretold in the Bible can equally apply to Gregorio Aglipay.

But Christ already foretold these things:

“False messiahs and false prophets will arise, and they will perform signs and wonders so great as to deceive, if that were possible, even the elect.25 Behold, I have told it to you beforehand.26 So if they say to you, ‘He is in the desert,’ do not go out there; if they say, ‘He is in the inner rooms,’ do not believe it.*27k For just as lightning comes from the east and is seen as far as the west, so will the coming of the Son of Man be.28 Wherever the corpse is, there the vultures will gather.” (Mt 24:24-28)

Bishop Emilio Marquez of Lucena denied Catholic burial rites for the freemason Gov. Rafael Nantes

LUCENA CITY—The denial of Catholic burial rites for the late Quezon Gov. Rafael Nantes—a known Freemason and “born-again Christian”—was in accordance with canon law and not politically motivated, a Church leader said here on Sunday.

In a homily delivered a day after Nantes’ burial, Bishop Emilio Marquez said the Diocese of Lucena would uphold its decision “unless some signs of repentance before death had been shown” by the deceased.

Marquez, a known critic of Nantes, noted that the governor’s death in a helicopter crash on Monday was sudden and unexpected, and that there was no way for the Church to determine whether he had repented.

The head of the diocese explained that the Church’s Code of Canon Law (Canon No. 1184 and No. 1185) denies Catholic burial rites for the likes of Nantes.

“We did not in any way forbid prayers for the eternal repose of his soul or to bless the mortal remains of the governor,” he said.

The bishop explained that the Church did not prohibit the celebration of Mass for the late provincial executive “as long as his (Nantes) body was not there.”

Marquez also disclosed that a relative of the late governor, Fr. Ed Nantes, a Dominican priest assigned in Indonesia, had sought his guidance on the matter.

“I told him that he can bless the mortal remains of the governor even with his habit on but he cannot say Mass in the presence of his (Nantes’) body,” Marquez said.

read more from Philippine Daily Inquirer

Monk’s Hobbit Notes:

The Code of Canon Law states:

Can. 1184 §1. Unless they gave some signs of repentance before death, the following must be deprived of ecclesiastical funerals:

1/ notorious apostates, heretics, and schismatics;

2/ those who chose the cremation of their bodies for reasons contrary to Christian faith;

3/ other manifest sinners who cannot be granted ecclesiastical funerals without public scandal of the faithful.

§2. If any doubt occurs, the local ordinary is to be consulted, and his judgment must be followed.

Can. 1185 Any funeral Mass must also be denied a person who is excluded from ecclesiastical funerals.

***
Clarification of the Congregation on Doctrine and Faith on the Status of Catholics Becoming Freemasons:

The present legislation of the Church is contained in canon 1374:

Can. 1374 A person who joins an association which plots against the Church is to be punished with a just penalty; one who promotes or takes office in such an association is to be punished with an interdict.

In the previous Code (can 2335), Masonry is explicitly mentioned. As the declaration of 26 November 1983 explains, the omission of the name “Mason” in the present Church law is due to an “editorial criterion”. Masonic associations are thus included under a more general heading which could include any other association conspiring against the Church (e.g. a specific communist party).

Fr. Marciano M. Guzman on the Retraction and Conversion of Jose Rizal

THE HARD FACTS ABOUT RIZAL’S CONVERSION
by Fr. Marciano M. Guzman

(The author, a direct descendant of Rizal’s younger sister, Soledad, has written extensively on related issues.)

From time to time, some individuals try to challenge the truth about Rizal’s final conversion as well as his retraction of religious errors before his execution.

These attempts to deny our national hero’s conversion and retraction are made without conclusive and documented evidence. They normally do not transcend the psychological arguments devised by the blatant disbelief and stubbornness of some members of masonic lodges.

Typical of such reaction was a statement made in 1908 by a Venerable Master of the Grand Regional Lodge of the Philippines. It was pronounced in a meeting called to counteract the effects of Wenceslao Retana’s personal conviction about Rizal’s retraction, expressed in the book Vida y escritos del Dr. Jose Rizal. “If Rizal did retract,” the high-ranking Filipino Mason said, “he might have done it through altruism and not for personal interest. But still I have not believed and remain disbelieving in his retraction, notwithstanding so many things said about it, and in spite of the assurances of Jesuits and Retana… the idol of the Philippines has never changed his ideas, in a word, he has never retracted.”

A similar type of argument could be found in Rafael Palma’s The Pride of the Malay Race. “Rizal was a man of character,” wrote Palma in his book, “and he had demonstrated it in many circumstances of his life. He was not likely to yield his ideas because his former preceptors and teachers talked to him. They did it in Dapitan and did not obtain any result. Why would he renounce his religious ideas for a few hours more of life?”

Those who wish to deny Rizal’s conversion in the last hours of his life go against solid historical evidence.

Facts of the Case

The most formidable proof is the document of Rizal’s retraction of errors and profession of faith, duly signed and drawn in his own handwriting from beginning to end.

J.M. Cavanna, CM, in his book Rizal and the Philippines of His Days, summarized the hard facts connected with this document. Several eyewitnesses were present when Rizal wrote this holograph. They included three Jesuit priests, four lieutenants of the army, three soldiers of the artillery corps, and a colonel of the Manila Garrison who acted as Judge Advocate in Rizal’s trial.

Moreover, on the day of the hero’s execution, his retraction holograph was presented to and examined by the Archbishop of Manila, the Vicar General, the Secretary of the Chancery, the Provincial Superior and two priests of the Society of Jesus, the Fiscal of the Audiencia, one newspaper editorial staff, a layman administrator of a pious confraternity, and most probably other people in the Ateneo and in the Archbishop’s residence where the document was brought.
On the day of Rizal’s death, the full text of the retraction document was published in four leading Manila papers of the widest circulation in the country. On the following days, another Manila newspaper and three Madrid papers with direct correspondents in Manila, together with at least six other Madrid dailies, four Spanish magazines and one Portuguese periodical in Hong Kong published the text of the document with many details about how it was written and signed by the national hero. One of these correspondents declared that “a sister of Dr. Jose Rizal gave him the news about the conversion and retraction of the glorious convict.”

Besides, as a proof of his unconditional acceptance of the Catholic faith, Rizal, on his own initiative, signed a Catholic prayer-book with a long, detailed, and explicit profession of faith. He did this after reciting publicly, on his knees before the altar, and in the presence of all the witnesses of his retraction, an act of faith followed by two other prayers of Christian hope and charity. Four eyewitnesses corroborated this fact, and 3 qualified witnesses, 4 newspapers of Manila and Madrid at that time, and 4 historians and writers confirmed their testimony.

It is on record that the national hero received the sacrament of Penance 4 times and received Holy Communion fervently during a Mass, before proceeding to Bagumbayan for the execution. At Bagumbayan, moments before his death, in the presence of a “compact multitude which filled Luneta’s esplanade,” Rizal, renewing his contrition for sins already confessed and for whatever he might have forgotten, again asked for forgiveness, kissing the crucifix presented to him by the priest, and for the last time received sacramental absolution.

The last absolution he received was recorded in an official document of the government. His previous four confessions in his prison cell were certified by 5 eyewitnesses, 10 qualified witnesses, 7 newspapers of Manila, Madrid and Hong Kong at that time, and 12 historians and writers including Aglipayan bishops, Masons and anti-clericals.

Moreover, Rizal’s conversion is highlighted by his Catholic marriage with Josephine Bracken, solemnized before the altar by a priest with sacred vestments, pronouncing the sacramental blessing according to the Roman Ritual. This solemn canonical marriage, which could not have taken place without Rizal’s previous conversion, was witnessed and attested to by many people.
Furthermore, the conversion of the national hero is supported by the many acts of Catholic piety—such as kneeling before the altar, praying the Rosary, putting on the blue scapular of the Immaculate Conception—which he spontaneously and publicly performed during his last hours.
Rizal’s death was certainly not that of a rationalist and free-thinker. “Sectarian interests,” J.M. Cavanna, CM, aptly commented, “have vainly wasted ink and paper in useless quibbles and cavils to deny the undeniable, or at least to cast doubts on the document of Rizal’s retraction which is the lasting monument of his unfading glory.”

What Caused His Conversion

Rizal’s Jesuit friends were not optimistic about the hero’s change of attitude regarding his religious ideas by noontime of December 29, 1896, the day before his execution. He was adamant about his religious beliefs and did not want to abjure Masonry.

Towards mid-afternoon, Fr. Vicente Balaguer, the Jesuit missionary who dealt with Rizal in Dapitan, had a serious discussion with the latter in his prison cell about religious matters. During their conversation, the priest frankly told him that unless he renounced his errors, he would surely be condemned in hell. Rizal finally gave his priest friend a faint glimmer of hope. He promised that he would sincerely pray to God for the gift of faith.

Close to 7 p.m., Rizal asked Fr. Jose Vilaclara, SJ, his former professor of Physics at the Ateneo, who had arrived less than an hour earlier, to hear his confession. He was told that he had to make a retraction of his religious errors first, and that a retraction formula was being sent to him from the Archbishop’s residence.

The hero eagerly awaited the arrival of the retraction document. It came at 10:00 p.m. Fr. Balaguer sat down with Rizal at the writing table and read to him the long formula prepared by the Archbishop. After hearing the first paragraphs, Rizal did not want to sign it.
He told Fr. Balaguer: “Father, do not proceed. That style is different from mine. I will not sign that, because it should be understood that I am writing it myself.”

Fr. Balaguer then produced the brief formula written by Fr. Pio Pi, SJ, Superior of the Jesuits in the Philippines, which the Archbishop had earlier deemed adequate. After listening to the first paragraph, Rizal signified his acceptance of it, since its style was simple, like his own writing style. While Fr. Balaguer read out the formula, Rizal proceeded to write it in his own handwriting, making at times some observation or adding some phrase. Thus we have a clear, undeniable proof of Rizal’s conversion.

What caused this radical change in the soul of the national hero? Was it primarily brought about by the way his Jesuit mentors and friends “directed the attack” to the sentiment, and not to reason, as Wenceslao Retana, the well-known Rizalist, charged? Did he, during those last hours, act under suggestion, influenced by “a series of phenomena” or “abnormal circumstances?” Was his conversion, in Retana’s description, “a romantic concession of the poet,” and not a “meditated concession of the philosopher?”

It is true that the Jesuits tried to appeal to Rizal’s feelings and sentiments in their effort to bring him back to the Catholic faith. Thus, in an early morning visit on December 29, Fr. Luis Viza brought him the little statue of the Sacred Heart of Jesus carved by Rizal when he was still a student at the Ateneo. Rizal took that image, kissed it, and placed it on his table.

Moreover, as we have earlier seen, during their discussion, Fr. Balaguer warned him that if he persisted in his errors, he would be condemned in hell. He also told him that his Jesuit friends would give their lives if by doing so they could attain the salvation of his soul.

However, we will not reflect the entire truth if we fail to consider the long conversation Fr. Balaguer had with Rizal about religious matters. Arguments, objections and refutations, with their strict appeal to reason and logic, were brought up during their discussion, as disclosed by Fr. Balaguer himself in his account.

In spite of all these, we still cannot rightfully say that Rizal owed his conversion to the influence of those good priests who were his former professors and friends, the sight of the image of the Sacred Heart that brought so many memories of the happy years of his boyhood, and the lively religious discussion he had with Fr. Balaguer. Neither can we truthfully say that his conversion was brought about by the special circumstances he was in, heightened by his imminent death.

God’s Grace

No external circumstance, no matter how special or extraordinary it may be, can cause a person’s conversion. Commenting on Retana’s allegation, J.M. Cavanna, CM, clearly explained this basic point.

“What happens after some event,” he said, “is not always due to that event. History proves that no amount of exterior circumstances can determine necessarily a conversion; and on the contrary, conversions may take place in the absence of the most powerful exterior stimuli and incentives.”

Of course, God can and does make use of human instruments and external circumstances to produce a conversion. Nevertheless, we have to affirm that a conversion is the exclusive work of God’s interior graces.

In Rizal’s case, we should not underestimate the supernatural efficacy of the prayers and penances offered by unidentified and unacknowledged members of religious communities to whom the Archbishop of Manila appealed in a circular, in his ardent zeal for Rizal’s conversion. With a few notable exceptions, our history books prefer to keep silent about such events.

Philippine Flag for Christians and Muslims: Add Our Lady of Fatima on top of a crescent moon

In the Letters section of the Philippine Star, a Muslim proposed to add a crescent moon on the Philippine flag (see picture here):

Since the avowed purpose for the modification of the flag is to give recognition to the Muslims of Mindanao, I suggest that we add a green CRESCENT instead to one of the stars (see proposed design above) in which manner the recognition intended them can be said to be clear, distinct, apparent and can be readily pointed to even by any grade school pupil and not to be lost within one of those rays that most people never care to count at all. More importantly, it hails them not just as mere freedom fighters but as Muslims. — DATU RUBEN S. BUAN SR., Datu Lukes of Maguindanao Sultanate, 102 Quezon Avenue, Poblacion 1, Cotabato City

I am sure many Christians like me would object to this.  If we add a CRESCENT, we must also add a CROSS, but not to place them side by side, overlapping each other, to form the hammer and sickle of the Communist Russia.  And since about 90% of Filipinos are Christians, the cross should be at least nine times bigger than the crescent moon.

But I am sure Muslims would object to the cross.  So why not choose a symbol dear to Christians and Muslims alike: Mary.  Mary is the Mother of Christ and Mary is also found in the Quran as Miriam.  Muslims revere Mary more than Fatima, the daughter of Muhammad.  As Archbishop Fulton Sheen wrote in his book, Mary and the Muslims:

Mary is for the Moslems the true Sayyida, or Lady. The only possible serious rival to her in their creed would be Fatima, the daughter of Mohammed himself. But after the death of Fatima, Mohammed wrote: “Thou shalt be the most blessed of all the women in Paradise, after Mary.” In a variant of the text, Fatima is made to say: “I surpass all the women, except Mary.”

This brings us to our second point, namely, why the Blessed Mother, in this twentieth century, should have revealed herself in the insignificant little village of Fatima, so that to all future generations she would be known as “Our Lady of Fatima.” Since nothing ever happens out of heaven except with a finesse of all details, I believe that the Blessed Virgin chose to be known as “Our Lady of Fatima” as a pledge and a sign of hope to the Moslem people, and as an assurance that they, who show her so much respect, will one day accept her Divine Son, too.

Evidence to support these views is found in the historical fact that the Moslems occupied Portugal for centuries. At the time when they were finally driven out, the last Moslem chief had a beautiful daughter by the name of Fatima. A Catholic boy fell in love with her, and for him she not only stayed behind when the Moslems left, but even embraced the faith. The young husband was so much in love with her that he changed the name of the town where he lived to Fatima. Thus, the very place where Our Lady appeared in 1917 bears a historical connection to Fatima, the daughter of Mohammed.

The final evidence of the relationship of Fatima to the Moslems is the enthusiastic reception which the Moslems in Africa and India and elsewhere gave to the Pilgrim statue of Our Lady of Fatima, as mentioned earlier. Moslems attended the Church services in honor of Our Lady; they allowed religious processions and even prayers before their mosques; and in Mozambique the Moslems, who were unconverted, began to be Christian as soon as the statue of Our Lady of Fatima was erected.

Because Muslims honor Our Lady of Fatima so much, it is fitting that our Lady should stand on top of the crescent moon as in the icon of Our Lady of Guadalupe or of the Immaculate Concepcion, which the Muslims also believe:

The Koran, which is the Bible of the Moslems, has many passages concerning the Blessed Virgin. First of all, the Koran believes in her Immaculate Conception and, also, in her Virgin Birth. The third chapter of the Koran places the history of Mary’s family in a genealogy which goes back through Abraham, Noah, and Adam. When one compares the Koran’s description of the birth of Mary with the apocryphal Gospel of the birth of Mary, one is tempted to believe that Mohammed very much depended upon the latter. Both books describe the old age and the definite sterility of the mother of Mary. When, however, she conceives, the mother of Mary is made to say in the Koran: “O Lord, I vow and I consecrate to you what is already within me. Accept it from me.”

When Mary is born, the mother says: “And I consecrate her with all of her posterity under thy protection, O Lord against Satan!”

The Koran passes over Joseph in the life of Mary, but the Moslem tradition knows his name and has some familiarity with him. In this tradition, Joseph is made to speak to Mary, who is a virgin. As he inquired how she conceived Jesus without a father, Mary answered: “Do you not know that God, when He created the wheat had no need of seed, and that God by His Power made the trees grow without the help of rain? All that God had to do was to say. ‘So be it, and it was done.'”

The Koran has also verses on the Annunciation, Visitation, and Nativity. Angels are pictured as accompanying the Blessed Mother and saying: “Oh, Mary, God has chosen you and purified you, and elected you above all the women of the earth.” In the nineteenth chapter of the Koran there are forty-one verses on Jesus and Mary. There is such a strong defense of the virginity of Mary here that the Koran, in the fourth book, attributes the condemnation of the Jews to their monstrous calumny against the Virgin Mary. (Bishop Fulton Sheen, Mary and the Moslems)

Our Protestant brothers may object to Mary.  But they can think of her simply as a Woman on top of a Crescent Moon described in the Book of Revelation (for Protestants will never believe unless it is in the Bible):

A great sign appeared in the sky, a woman clothed with the sun, with the moon under her feet, and on her head a crown of twelve stars. (Rev 12:1)

How about the members of Iglesia ni Cristo and of the Masons?  The Philippine flag already contains the triangle, the stars, and the sun, which are their common symbols (see comparison of INC and Masonic logos).

I think this proposal of adding our Lady of Fatima on top of the crescent would be acceptable to all Faiths: Catholics, Protestants, Muslims, and Masons.  If we remove Our Lady, we must also remove the Crescent, and many would be happy with our flag as it is.

Iglesia ni Cristo (INC) logo: Christian or Masonic symbol?

I found an interesting article from Pinoy Catholic on the meaning of the Iglesia ni Cristo (INC) logo:

  1. The interlaced square and compass denotes Freemasonry
  2. The crown at the center denotes the Order of Amaranth, a fraternal organization of master masons and their properly qualified female relatives
  3. The compass, inverted triangle, and legs denotes the Order of the Eastern Star
  4. The light rays at the background denotes the sun god.
  5. The scales of justice denotes the Scales of Maat, the Egyptian goddess of truth, order, balance, and justice
  6. The bible inside the inverted triangle and compass refers to the use of the bible in masonic lodge for swearing oaths
  7. The dove and the color white denotes purity and innocence
  8. The color red denotes courage, zeal, and blood of life–the color of Royal Arch Masonry
  9. The color green denotes spiritual initiation into the high mysteries of life and god
  10. The color blue recalls the dome of the heavens which denotes universal brotherhood and friendship
  11. The inverted triangle points to the 22nd ray which probably signifies a 22nd degree mason–Knight of the Royal Axe.

To be fair to INC, I’ll try to provide a biblical meaning to  the INC logo, with their doctrines in mind:

  1. The dove is the dove of Noah.  Just as the evil world was washed away by the flood and a new world was born, so was the apostate Catholic Church was abandoned by God and He established a new church, Iglesia ni Cristo, at the end of time.
  2. The sun’s rays and the bible denotes the Prologue of John: “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things came to be through him, and without him nothing came to be. What came to be through him was life, and this life was the light of the human race; the light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it.” (Jn 1:1-5)  Surprisingly, this passage proves the divinity of Christ, which INC does not believe.
  3. The lamb and dove denotes the Baptism of Christ: “Behold, the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world. He is the one of whom I said, ‘A man is coming after me who ranks ahead of me because he existed before me.’ I did not know him, but the reason why I came baptizing with water was that he might be made known to Israel.” John testified further, saying, “I saw the Spirit come down like a dove from the sky and remain upon him. I did not know him, but the one who sent me to baptize with water told me, ‘On whomever you see the Spirit come down and remain, he is the one who will baptize with the holy Spirit.'”  Surprisingly, the INC also does not believe on the divinity of the Holy Spirit.
  4. The Triangle denotes the Dogma of the Holy Trinity, which states that there are three Persons in one God.  Christ himself gave the following Trinitarian formula for Bapstism: “Go, therefore, and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you.” (Mt 28:19-20). Surprisingly, INC does not believe on the Trinity.

Thus, INC uses Christian symbols, but does not believe on the meaning of the symbols.  (The INC has not still provided an official interpretation of their logo).

Now, where is the Sign of the Cross?  I cannot find any.

  1. “Then he called to the man dressed in linen with the writer’s case at his waist, saying to him: Pass through the city (through Jerusalem) and mark an X on the foreheads of those who moan and groan over all the abominations that are practiced within it. To the others I heard him say: Pass through the city after him and strike! Do not look on them with pity nor show any mercy! Old men, youths and maidens, women and children–wipe them out! But do not touch any marked with the X; begin at my sanctuary. So they began with the men (the elders) who were in front of the temple.” The Hebrew letter X is Tav (or Taw) whose ancient form is the cross †, from which came the Greek letter Tau \tau.
  2. “If anyone wishes to come after me, he must deny himself and take up his cross daily 11 and follow me. For whoever wishes to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake will save it.” (Lk 9:23-24)
  3. “If anyone says to you then, ‘Look, here is the Messiah!’ or, ‘There he is!’ do not believe it. False messiahs and false prophets will arise, and they will perform signs and wonders so great as to deceive, if that were possible, even the elect. Behold, I have told it to you beforehand. So if they say to you, ‘He is in the desert,’ do not go out there; if they say, ‘He is in the inner rooms,’ do not believe it. For just as lightning comes from the east and is seen as far as the west, so will the coming of the Son of Man be. Wherever the corpse is, there the vultures will gather. “Immediately after the tribulation of those days, the sun will be darkened, and the moon will not give its light, and the stars will fall from the sky, and the powers of the heavens will be shaken. And then the sign of the Son of Man will appear in heaven, and all the tribes of the earth will mourn, and they will see the Son of Man coming upon the clouds of heaven with power and great glory. And he will send out his angels 18 with a trumpet blast, and they will gather his elect from the four winds, from one end of the heavens to the other.” (Mt 24:23-31)  The sign of the Son of Man is the cross because his corpse hung there.
  4. “For Christ did not send me to baptize but to preach the gospel, and not with the wisdom of human eloquence, so that the cross of Christ might not be emptied of its meaning. The message of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God. For it is written: “I will destroy the wisdom of the wise, and the learning of the learned I will set aside.” Where is the wise one? Where is the scribe? Where is the debater of this age? Has not God made the wisdom of the world foolish? For since in the wisdom of God the world did not come to know God through wisdom, it was the will of God through the foolishness of the proclamation to save those who have faith. For Jews demand signs and Greeks look for wisdom, but we proclaim Christ crucified, a stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles, but to those who are called, Jews and Greeks alike, Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God.” (1 Cor 1:17-24)

So why is there no Sign of the Cross in the INC logo?  Is INC inviting the wrath of God to destroy its members starting from its temples?  Does INC wish to follow Christ but without a cross in its temples to carry?  Does INC await the coming of Christ but thinks that the Sign of the Son of Man is not the cross but a compass?  Does INC wish to proclaim the cross of Christ like St. Paul or rather the message of Felix Y. Manalo, whom they consider as an angel?  As St. Paul said: “But there are some who are disturbing you and wish to pervert the gospel of Christ. But even if we or an angel from heaven should preach (to you) a gospel other than the one that we preached to you, let that one be accursed! As we have said before, and now I say again, if anyone preaches to you a gospel other than the one that you received, let that one be accursed!” (Gal 1:7-9). Lucifer is also an angel of light because in Latin, the word “Lucifer” means “Light-Bringer” (from lux, lucis, “light”, and ferre, “to bear, bring”). Lucifer is he whom the Freemasons worship.  As Christ said: “And if the light in you is darkness, how great will the darkness be.” (Mt 6:23)

Book Review: “The Rizal-Pastells Correspondence” by Fr. Raul J. Bonoan, S.J.

The Hitherto Unpublished Letters of Jose Rizal and Portions of Fr. Pablo Pastell’s Fourth Letter and Translation of the Correspondence, together with a Historical Background and Theological Critique (Ateneo de Manila University Press, Bellarmine Hall, Katipunan Avenue, Loyola Heights, Quezon City, P.O. Box 154, 1099 Manila, Philippines)

This book tells the story of two brilliant men.

The first is the Philippine National Hero, Dr. Jose Rizal.  He was the distinguished poet in the Spanish tongue, the master of Philippine dialects and European languages, the humble devotee of the Virgin Mary and the Sacred Heart of Jesus, who later became a leader of the Propaganda Movement, the writer of the subversive novels Noli me Tangere and El Filibusterismo, and a member of Freemasonry in London.  In short, Jose Rizal was the Spanish poet who became anti-Spain,  the Catholic who became anti-Catholic, the student of the Jesuits who made a “shipwreck of Faith.”  In 1896 in Bagumbayan in Manila, Jose Rizal was executed for treason against Spain by firing squad.  He was thirty-five.

The second is Fr. Pablo Pastells, S.J.  He was  the student in the Jesuit-run Seminario Conciliar in Barcelona, a refugee in France after the fourth suppression of Jesuits in Spain in 1868, a man in lay clothes running from anticlerical elements after the defeat of Napoleon in the Franco-Prussian war, the priest who organized circulos or worker groups in Europe to the anger of Anarchists.  Pastells arrived in the Philippines in 1875.  In the middle of the following year he was sent to Ateneo de Manila and became the director of the Sodality of Our Lady.  In this capacity and as a prefect of the boarders, he came to know the fourteen year old Rizal.  He travelled as a missionary in the Visayan and Mindanao Islands to study the language of the natives.  He was  appointed Superior of the of the Philippine Mission in 1888, and it was at the end of his term of office that his correspondence with Rizal began.  Pastells was sent back again to Spain in 1893 to write about the Spanish Jesuit’s overseas work, resulting to a three-volume history book (1916-1917), and another nine-volume work on the History of the Philippines (1925-1934).  In 1932, he died at the age of eighty-six.

* * *

The book is divided into two parts.  The first part is an Introduction by Fr. Raul J. Bonoan, S.J., which consists of a historical background and a theological critique.

The historical background is well written and researched, with long footnotes.  When Rizal was exiled in Dapitan in Mindanao, Rizal told Fr. Sanchez who tried to bring him back to the Catholic Faith:

It is useless, Father, you do not convince me.  I do not believe in the Eucharist or in the rites of the Catholic religion.

But to his mother Rizal wrote (which Fr. Sanchez confirmed):

We heard mass at midnight, for you ought to know that here I hear Mass every Sunday.  (Underlining by Rizal.)

I expected these things.  But for a physicist, here is a surprising trivia: From Rizal’s friend, Ferdinand Blumentritt, Fr. Federico Faura, S.J., the founder of the Manila Observatory, learned of Blumentritt’s fear that Rizal became a Mason.  And Fr. Bonoan continues:

When Fr. Ramon, the rector, and Faura in conversation with their guest raised the question of his religious beliefs, Rizal made protestations of loyalty to Spain but said it was useless to discuss religious matters inasmuch as he had long lost the faith.  Whereupon, Faura sternly warned him never again to step into the corridors of the Ateneo if he should persist in his erroneous beliefs, for the Jesuit fathers were breaking all contact with him, and advised him to leave the Philippines for good lest he end up on the scaffold.  Rizal remained unmoved.

Fr. Faura correctly predicted the last storm: Rizal was executed, and his death ushered the Philippine Revolution.

Fr. Bonoan’s theological critique of Rizal and Fr. Pastells is also well-written.  But reading through his critique, Fr. Bonoan showed more sympathy for Rizal than for Pastells:  He upheld Rizal’s primacy of conscience and contrasted Pastell’s Vatican I mindset with the teachings of Vatican II.  If you want to know the details, read the book.

But my sympathies are for Pastells.  And to him we can quote Fr. Horacio de la Costa’s words:

But look at it another way.   Look at it through the eyes of a Spanish friar who found himself a prisoner of the Army of the Revolution.  He was the last of a long line of missionaries, stretching back to that great defender of Rights, Fray Domingo de Salazar.  They had brought this whole people from primitive tribalism to civilization.  They had raised from stones children of Abraham.  And in the end, the children had turned on their fathers.

It was not only tragic; it was the very essence of tragedy

–Fr. Horacio de la Costa, “The Priest in the Philippine Life and Society: An Historical View,” in Church and Sacraments, ed. by Ma. Victoria B. Parco (Office of Research and Publications, Ateneo de Manila University, 1990), pp. 192-200.

CONTENTS

Acknowledgments
References to the Correspondence
Abbreviations

Part 1. Introduction

Preliminary Notes

Two Separate Paths: Historical Background

  1. The Young Rizal and the Jesuits
  2. The European Experiment
  3. The Shipwreck of Faith
  4. Pastells and the Spanish Jesuits
  5. Arrest and Exile

The Clash of Cultures: Theological Critique

  1. The Enlightenment and the Catholic Response
  2. Private Judgment
  3. The Problem of God
  4. Revelation
  5. Conclusion

Part 2.  The Spanish Text of Rizal’s Letters and the Missing Portions of Pastell’s Fourth Letter

The First Letter of Rizal
The Second Letter of Rizal
The Third Letter of Rizal
The Fourth Letter of Rizal
The Fifth Letter of Rizal
Portions of the Pastell’s Fourth Letter Missing in the Epislorio Rizalino

Part 3.  Translations of the Correspondence

The First Letter of Rizal
The First Letter of Pastells
The Second Letter of Rizal
The Second Letter of Pastells
The Third Letter of Rizal
The Third Letter of Pastells
The Fourth Letter of Rizal
The Fourth Letter of Pastells
The Fifth Letter of Rizal

References
Index

Book Review: “Conspiracy Against Life: Evangelium Vitae’s Conclusive Evidence”

Today we are amidst the battle between the forces of Life and and of Death.  This battle is fought not against “flesh  and blood ; but against principalities and power, against the rulers of the world of this darkness, against the spirits of wickedness in the high places” (Eph 6:12).  To know whom we in the Pro-Life Movement are fighting against, read this book:

Conspiracy Against Life: Evangelium Vitae’s Conclusive Evidence (Two Hearts Media Organization, 1996). (Amazon, Bookmooch)

SOURCES (from the Foreword):

  1. Pope John Paul II.  He wrote the longes encyclical letter ever published—the Evangelium Vitae.  The gravity of its message was strongly underscored during the 3d Pro-Life Conference in Rome which called to attention all Bishops and Catholics who are compr[om]ising in their morals and are firm advocates of the contraceptive lifestyle.  Bishops and Catolics who maintain this anti-life belief can be penalized by Rome if they do not conform to the Church’s teachings.  In the past, almost fifty percent of American and European Bishops went against Pope Paul VI because of his encyclical, Humanae Vitae.
  2. There exists in the United States a confidential document, as revealed by the Pontifical Council on Family Life, known as the National Social Security Memorandum 200 (NSSM 200).  This classified document specifically mentions the concern of the U.S. over the growing depletion of natural resources and the subsequent increase in population growth, that if left uncontrolled this phenomenon will cause major security problems for the United States (NSSM 200, p. 44).  It mentions the Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia, India, Pakistan, Ethiopia, and Bangladesh as America’s target for its depopulation program (NSSM 200, 1974, p. 101).  And they will do this using US AID.
  3. There are other materials which were provided by known authorities of New World Order from Canada and the United Staes, like Gilles Grondin who holds a copy of the Rockefeller File which exposes how the Freemasons control the U.S. government, especially its Treasury, the State Department, and the United Nations.
  4. Malachi Martin.  He is a noted relgious writer with Vatican connections, holds another explosive material, NSSM 400.  He shares materials with our research center staff in U.S.A. and Canada.  He wrote The Keys of this Blood, a powerful book on the conspiracy against the weak.
  5. En Route to Global Occupation by Gary Kah; Committee of 300, Conspirators by Dr. John Coleman; Unveiling the Mystery of Freemasonry, by the Cardinal Caro y Rodriguez; U.N. Rule the World; the Lords of Poverty, by Graham Hancock; New World Order; Iron Mountain; Beyond Freemasonry by William Schoenbelen; the Morals and Dogma of Freemasonry by Albert Pike; CBCP Decision on Freemasonry–March 14, 1990; The New American Magazine, Bimonthly Magazine.
  6. All documents from the United Nations Conferences which we collated from 1992 to 1996: the Rio de Janiero World Summit on Human Environment, 1992; U.N. World Summit on Human Rights, 1993-Vienna; U.N. International Conference on Population Development, 1994-Cairo; U.N. World Summit on Social Development, 1995-Copenhagen; U.N. 4th Women World Conference, 1995-Beijing; U.N. Habitat II Preparatory Meeting, 1996-New York

CONTENTS:

Foreword
Reader’s Guide

I.  A Global Conspiracy

    The Plot, Hidden Agenda, Main Target, Totalitarianism, Apparent Culprit, Global Control

II. The Conspirators’s Front

    The NSSM 200 (Kissinger Report), New World Order, Committee of 300, C-300’s Tightly Guarded Secrets

III. The United Nations

    The Conspirator’s Killing Machine, International Planned Parenthood Foundation (IPPF), One World Citizenship, UN Declaration on its 50th Anniversary, UN Conference on Environmental Development (UNCED), UN World Conference on Human Rights, UN Int’l Conference on Population and Development, UN World Summit on Human Development, UN 4th World Conference on Women, Habitat II: UN Conference on Human Settlements

IV. Freemasons: The Real Conspirators Against Life

    Origin of Freemasonry, The Goal of Masonry, Sources of Authoritative Literature of Masonry, Kabbalism, Gnosticism, Knights Templars, Roscrusians, Illuminati, the Palladium Rite, New World Order and Freemasonry, Globalists and Piggy Globalists, old Internationale and Freemasonry, Ren Internationale and Freemasonry, Roman Catholic Church and Freemasonry, the Roman Catholic Church’s Stand on Freemasonry

V. Spiritual Warfare

    By their Fruits You Will Know Them, The Real Enemy: the Devil and His Weapons, Solution

VI. Bitter Truth

    Mass Media Control, Information, Education and Communication (IEC), Anti-Defamation League (ADL), Six Principles of Deception, Lie Against Women, Breakdown of the Family, Corruption of Youth, Attack Against the Clergy

VII. Evangelium Vitae and the Alliance of the Two Hearts

    Evangelium Vitae, Communion of Reparation, Consecration of the Family to the Sacred Heart of Jesus and Immaculate Heart of Mary, House-toHouse Evangelism, Reading of the Word of God, FamilyReconciliation, Family Rosary, Blessing of the Home, Imposition of the Scapular, Home Study Program, Promise of Virginity, Pledge of Conjugal Chastity

Supplementary Materials

    Feminism: the Six Frauds, RU 486: the Rest of the Story, A Woman’s Right to Choose—Woman and the Problem of Pregnancy, Had an Abortion? Feeling Bad? A Guide to Fertility, To Deceive a Nation: AIDS Update 1993, Planned Parenthood: It’s Not What You Think, Blessed are the Pure in Heart, What is Worth? Evolution, Secularism and the Attack of the Church, Good Priests Need Your Support, Censorship in a Pluralistic Society, Television’s Double-Edged Impact on Family Life