One million red ribbons against RH Law in the Philippines

No to RH Law in the Philippines

No to RH Law in the Philippines

In a few days, Pres. Noynoy Aquino will sign the RH Bill into a law. It appears that there is no way that this bill can be stopped from being signed. So maybe we need a rallying symbol in the battle against the RH law. So I would like to propose the logo above. Its design is that of the Chi-Rho sign of Constantine, the sign which was painted on the shields of his armies before the decisive Battle of the Milvian Bridge. According to legends, the Chi-Rho sign appeared in Constantine’s dream with the words, “In hoc signo vinces” or “By this sign you shall conquer”.

The other motivation for the logo is the “One Million Red Ribbons” campaign against the RH Bill. My friends do not like the Aquino symbol of yellow ribbon. The only problem with this campaign is that it was originally made for the HIV/AIDS awareness. So I think it is not a good idea to use the same symbol and campaign name. A modifier is needed: One Million Red Ribbons against RH law. A shorter alternative would be No to RH in PH.

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Christ the King Procession

Last Sunday, in our parish in Makati, we had a procession for the Feast of Christ the King.

Three white-robed sacristans walked in front: the one at the center carried a pole with a mounted cross, the sign of the Son of Man that Constantine saw in the heavens, the night before the decisive Battle of the Milvian Bridge, on the same date last month, October 28, 312 A.D.; the other two held similar poles but with candles, which signified the light of Christ piercing the darkening day.

The band followed next in their crisp, green uniform, with golden, twisted cords. Their tuba and trumpets brayed over the bellowing drums, as when the Hosts of the West marched towards the Black Gates, shouting, “The King Elessar has come to reclaim this land! Depart hence or yield them up!” But the band knows no song for Christ the King: no Christus Vincit, no Christus Herat, no Christus Imperat. Instead, the band played songs from the mass like the “Ama Namin,” and I am content. The better must not be the enemy of the good.

Four men carried the picture of Christ the King. Christ wore a double crown gold and bejeweled, signifying his kingship over heaven and earth (c.f. Mt 28:18). His cape was red as His Most Precious Blood: “Worthy is the Lamb that was slain to receive power and riches, wisdom and strength, honor and glory and blessing” (Rev 5:12).  His left hand held a golden scepter, shaped like a reed, which signified He who shall bring justice on earth (Is 42:1-3).  His right hand is raised, with three fingers pointing upward, signifying the Trinity.  His Most Sacred Heart was burning in flames, pierced by a cross and crowned with thorns: “It is not you they reject; they are rejecting me as their king” (1 Sam 8:8).

Two men walked behind the image, and twenty women followed, praying the rosary.

Sad.