Was the CCP Poleteismo exhibit condemned by the bishops shown before in Loyola House of Studies?

Update: Loyola House of Studies denies showing controversial works of Mideo Cruz at 2007 Tutok Nexus Exhibit

From the Business World:

Since the controversy over Poleteismo exploded, the CCP’s Visual Arts Unit has been fielding calls from people requesting that Kulo be shut down. “The CCP will not be party to any censorship or suppression. Let it be a point of discussion,” said Ms. Flores, adding that she has seen works at the CCP that were “really, really, really more provocative and disturbing.” (Jose Legaspi’s installation in the Small Gallery, for example, which included a modified Pieta showing the Virgin Mother vomiting on the dead Christ.)

Poleteismo is an old piece first shown in 2002 at the Vargas Museum of the University of the Philippines. Mr. Cruz wasn’t thinking of the Reproductive Health Bill when he conceived Poleteismo nine years ago.

Versions of the installation have been exhibited elsewhere, most notably in 2007 in the lobby of the Loyola House of Studies (LHS) — a seminary inside the campus of the Ateneo de Manila University — as part of Tutok: Nexus, a group exhibit organized in cooperation with Simbahang Lingkod ng Bayan (SLB), “an association of religious priests, seminarians and lay people committed to the service of the Filipino Church and the Filipino nation.”

If Catholic clergymen had kept quiet, if Archbishop Oscar Cruz hadn’t called the exhibit “sickening,” if he hadn’t called the artist “sick,” if he hadn’t advised the artist to see a psychiatrist, if he hadn’t implied that the artist’s sexuality was abnormal, if Bishop Deogracias Iniguez hadn’t called for a boycott, then Mideo Cruz’s Poleteismo could have gone unnoticed by the larger public.

When they find it in one of the alcoves of the Main Gallery, they will see multicolored plastic piggy banks stuffed inside a case usually reserved for religious statues; and Christ the King with a bright red clown nose, his right hand replaced by a Mickey Mouse glove, and his head crowned with Mickey Mouse ears made from a Coke can.

Hanging behind a divider is a cross with a bright red penis thrusting out from the vertical bar. And on the walls, a multimedia collage composed of a confusion of images and objects: there are ads, political paraphernalia from Fernando Poe Junior, Gilbert Teodoro, and Barack Obama; there are religious posters of Jesus Christ, Virgin Mary, and the Holy Family; there are handouts, pamphlets, and stickers; there are rosaries, penis ashtrays, crucifixes, condoms, and Christmas lights; there’s a lot of stuff.

“Thereís nothing there that you won’t see in Quiapo,” said Karen O. Flores, officer-in-charge of the CCP Visual Arts Unit.

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Fr. Joe Zerrudo: We need 60 million pesos to establish a Traditional Latin Mass personal parish in Manila

I attended a Traditional Latin Mass in Sikatuna, Quezon City today.  In his homily, Fr. Joe Zerrudo appealed to his flock that they must be zealous in raising Php 60 million, if they want to buy the lot in Cubao and build a church there exclusively for the Traditional Latin Mass.  After more than a month, the church-goers were only able to raise about a hundred thousand.  So one year will just be about one million.  And 60 million means 60 years.

Fr. Zerrudo recounted how he got the permission to celebrate the Traditional Latin Mass in Cubao during the Ecclesia Dei era (pre-Summorum Pontificum).  Fr. Zerrudo already got a permission from Cardinal Sin before when Metro Manila belongs to a single Archdiocese.  But when the archdiocese was split into several dioceses, Cubao became a separate diocese under Bishop Honesto F. Ongtioco.  And Fr. Zerrudo had to seek another permission.

“Bishop,” Fr. Zerrudo said, “Cavite already has a personal parish for the Traditional Latin Mass, with the approval of Bishop Tagle.   So why can’t we have one in Cubao?”

Bishop Ontioco signed the permit.

Fr. Zerrudo’s flock come from all over Metro Manila.  My estimate is that they number about a 100 to 150.  They follow him wherever he is assigned.  At present, Fr. Zerrudo celebrates mass at 1:30–3:00 p.m. at the Parish of Our Lord of Divine Mercy in Sikatuna, Quezon City.  They were only permitted to celebrate mass there; the original parishioners hear mass in English Novus Ordo (Ordinary Form).  They have a mass right after the TLM mass.

“I know you have wealthy friends outside the Philippines.  I asked you to give me their addresses so that I can write to them,” Fr. Zerrudo said.

“What we shall construct will be the first personal parish in the Philippines exclusive to the Traditional Latin Mass.  Let us take this opportunity while the Bishop of Cubao is permitting us to do this.  Let us take this opportunity while His Holiness Benedict XVI is still the pope.  Otherwise, if we get turned away again, and we still have no personal parish established, then I shall find a little room for my altar and outside you shall hear mass with your umbrellas.

“The other option is to wait for the SSPX to be part of the Church hierarchy.  And I would gladly celebrate mass in their chapels (They have a chapel in Our Lady of Victory Church in Cubao).  But this re-entry of the SSPX is unlikely this year or in the next.

“Next week will be the Feast of Christ the King.  We will have 40-hour devotion in front of the Blessed Sacrament exposed.  But since we cannot have it here in the church, then we shall have it in another place (St. Paul’s?) as long as their is no wake the dead there.  We shall start at 1 p.m. on a Friday and end at 1 p.m. on a Sunday.  We shall not anymore have a procession: we are so few and we would look pathetic.  We shall join the bigger one by the Novus Ordo on November 11.”

Here are the contact details of Fr. Zerrudo (I can’t find his email):

FR. MICHELL JOE B. ZERRUDO
Parish Priest
Lord of Divine Mercy Parish
Madasalin cor. Maamo St., Sikatuna Vill., Quezon City
Tel: (02) 921-3337, 433-3239

E-mail: jojozerrudo@yahoo.com

My prize in elementary storytelling contest: pictures of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary

When I was a Grade 1 student in St. Rose of Lima School in Bacolod City, I was asked to represent the class in a storytelling contest vs. the representatives of Grades 2 and 3.  My story piece is “The Boy who Cried Wolf.”  When the results were out, the winner was Grade 3, followed by Grade 2, and I for Grade 1.  My prize: two one-inch pictures of the Sacred Heart Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary connected by a hinge.  The pictures are framed with ornate plastic painted with gold.

My mother was proud of my prize.  She placed it on our altar where we pray the rosary every night.  Me and my brothers and sisters were already trying to fend of sleep, but pray we must.  My mother and father were kneeling, and so must we till the rosary ended, complete with the Litany (I just noticed the number litany prayers is the same as the number of the rosary beads).

I don’t know what happened to my little prize.  I think it was kept in a cabinet together with my journal notebooks–my mother keeps little things about me and my other brothers and sisters.  My mother died about ten years ago, but her face lit by candles as she prayed on our altar I still remember clearly.  Before she died, she entrusted me to Our Lady of Guadalupe.  And Our Lady has become my mother.

On my present workdesk are two 20 inch by 20 inch pictures connected by a hinge: the pictures of the Christ the King and Our Lady of Guadalupe.  The Sacred Heart of Jesus is visble: aflame, crowned with thorns, mounted with a cross.  The Immaculate Heart of Mary is invisible, yet her hands joined in prayer and the flower on her dress above her hands suggests her Immaculate Heart.  I gazed and gazed and smiled.  The boy who cried wolf, now cries “Lord, Lord!” and “Mama, Mama!”  Thank you for making me win third place, so that I will place first in your hearts.

Christ the King Procession

Last Sunday, in our parish in Makati, we had a procession for the Feast of Christ the King.

Three white-robed sacristans walked in front: the one at the center carried a pole with a mounted cross, the sign of the Son of Man that Constantine saw in the heavens, the night before the decisive Battle of the Milvian Bridge, on the same date last month, October 28, 312 A.D.; the other two held similar poles but with candles, which signified the light of Christ piercing the darkening day.

The band followed next in their crisp, green uniform, with golden, twisted cords. Their tuba and trumpets brayed over the bellowing drums, as when the Hosts of the West marched towards the Black Gates, shouting, “The King Elessar has come to reclaim this land! Depart hence or yield them up!” But the band knows no song for Christ the King: no Christus Vincit, no Christus Herat, no Christus Imperat. Instead, the band played songs from the mass like the “Ama Namin,” and I am content. The better must not be the enemy of the good.

Four men carried the picture of Christ the King. Christ wore a double crown gold and bejeweled, signifying his kingship over heaven and earth (c.f. Mt 28:18). His cape was red as His Most Precious Blood: “Worthy is the Lamb that was slain to receive power and riches, wisdom and strength, honor and glory and blessing” (Rev 5:12).  His left hand held a golden scepter, shaped like a reed, which signified He who shall bring justice on earth (Is 42:1-3).  His right hand is raised, with three fingers pointing upward, signifying the Trinity.  His Most Sacred Heart was burning in flames, pierced by a cross and crowned with thorns: “It is not you they reject; they are rejecting me as their king” (1 Sam 8:8).

Two men walked behind the image, and twenty women followed, praying the rosary.

Sad.